Jobs lost at a minimum

by John Hood Correct ideas are not always popular ones. I freely admit that most North Carolinians favor increasing the legal minimum wage, through either congressional or legislative action. Supporters believe that it will help workers rise out of poverty, and that the cost will...

Wake school estimates must be double-checked

by Robert Luebke Before Wake County asks taxpayers for pay for more buildings, the school system needs to ensure its population estimates are accurate. In October 2013, Wake County voters approved an $810 million bond referendum to finance new schools and repairs. Now, a little...

A brief history of Tar Heel presidential politics

Capitol Press Association by Patrick Gannon An early poll suggests that North Carolina will again be a battleground state in the 2016 presidential race, especially if former First Lady Hillary Clinton ends up as the Democratic nominee. Raleigh-based Public Policy Polling released...

Put family farmers back into Farm-to-School

by Wyatt Fraas Center for Rural Affairs Farm-to-school programs appeared in the 1990s with a three-way focus: fresh, local foods in schools; agriculture and nutrition education in classrooms; and purchases that support local family farms. Years since have seen these programs grow...

From the ‘there is no voter fraud in N.C.’ file

by Susan Myrick The midterm elections saw record turnout and relatively few glitches, but a few things stood out to undermine the liberal claim that “there is no voter fraud in North Carolina.” Here are just a few examples of potential or actual fraud. Famous felon votes No voter...

Transportation priorities a test for administration

by Patrick Gannon Last week, state officials released the first batch of transportation projects to be funded through 2025 under the new strategic mobility formula proposed by Gov. Pat McCrory and approved by the General Assembly. Lawmakers, transportation officials and the...

Got to pick a pocket?

by John Hood Did Fagin’s pickpockets stimulate the economy of London? If you’ve read Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist or seen the musical derived from it, you’ll immediately recognize the name. Fagin is the rogue who takes in orphans and runaways, trains them to pick pockets and...

New speaker troubles Eeyore Caucus

by John Hood When the news broke that Rep. Tim Moore would be the Republican nominee for speaker of the North Carolina House and Rep. Mike Hager would be majority leader, the usual suspects did the usual things. Politicians seeking power, lobbyists seeking favors, and reporters...

Politicians are thankful, too

by Patrick Gannon Politicians and others involved in government in North Carolina have plenty to be grateful for this Thanksgiving. The N.C. Democratic Party can be thankful for Asheville and Buncombe County voters. Without them, the election would have been an unmiti-gated...

Charter schools prove their value

by Robert Luebke Recently The News & Observer and the (Wilmington) StarNews published an article that raised questions about charter schools in North Carolina. Unfortunately, the piece devoted a large chunk of news space to what was essentially a hit piece on charter schools,...

You decide: How are farming and manufacturing alike?

You Decide by Dr. Mike Walden I have a soft spot in my heart for both farmers and factory workers. One of my grandfathers was a farmer in Ohio during the early 1900s. My father — the eldest son — told me many stories of awakening before sunrise to do numerous chores before he...

Legends of the fall

by John Hood Why did Democrats have a disappointing midterm election? Ask the Democrats. They’ve been thinking about this a lot and offer many explanations. Let’s explore their various legends of the fall campaign. One is that they lost because of low turnout. Well, it’s true...